The Hipstamatic Blog

Tangled :: A Photo Story

Photography by Chiun-Kai Shih
All photos shot using John S Lens / C-Type Plate Film


Hair: Luke Baker
Makeup: Akiko for MAC
Models: Nicholas Ronyai + Ben Lark @ DNA
Producer: Clarissa Morales

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This post is part of our Snap Highlight

Snap is a free monthly digtial publication from Hipstmatic on the iPad. Snap showcases the driving forces behind global creative culture, and explores provocative new ways to interpret the beauty around us.

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Bug-a-Boo

Macro photography by Caleb Messer

(Source: snapm.ag)

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Dave Norbut


Photographs by Dave Norbut. Words by Molli Sullivan.

Hipstamatic was created around the idea of blending old and new, so we’re always stoked when we see our community iterating on that same philosophy.

Dave Norbut, a Hipstamatic photographer specializing in portraits, is blending one of the oldest methods of printing— salt prints — with his beautiful Hipstamatic Tintype portraits.

“I wanted to put my hands back into the process. I just didn’t know exactly what I wanted to do,” said Norbut. “When Hipstamatic released the Tintype Snap Pak, it dawned on me: Wouldn’t it be great to actually print these with one of the old processes? So I set out to take a series of portraits, all the while studying and preparing to print them old school.”

Norbut landed on the salt print process, which was invented in the mid-1800s and is one of the first ways photographic images were put to paper. The results are pretty impressive, so be sure to check out more of Dave’s work online. 

(Source: snapm.ag)

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Q & A with Zachary Quinto


Q & A WITH ZACHARY QUINTO

Photography by Chiun-Kai Shih / Interview by Molli Sullivan

Most everyone knows you as a movie and television star, but you have a very accomplished theater career as well. Can you tell us a bit about why you love theater so much? 

The theater is where it all began for me. I have studied and performed on stage since I was 10 years old, and earned a BFA in acting from Carnegie Mellon School of Drama. My decision to move to LA after graduation was always intended as a means to an end. My goal was to build myself a film and television career that would allow me to diversify and focus on other aspects of storytelling also. Coming back to the theater is mostly about making good on a promise to myself. I’ve worked hard in Los Angeles to get myself to a point where I can leave and embrace other experiences. I finally feel that I am at that point, so I feel I must take the leap in continued pursuit of creative integrity and authenticity.

At this point in your career, you can be selective about the projects you work on. Why were you drawn to The Glass Menagerie?

There are so many factors that contributed to my decision. Firstly, the play and the playwright. To dive into this kind of classic American play is a true gift for any actor. To become deeply familiar with and connected to the language of such a master as Tennessee Williams is what drives me in my work. And then to play the most autobiographical character in his canon is the icing on the creative cake. Then there is the group of people assembling to bring this production to life. They are each truly remarkable and renowned. The opportunity to work with the likes of John Tiffany and Steven Hoggett and Bob Crowley and Cherry Jones was simply too much to pass up. And then the process. Being in Cambridge at one of the most respected regional theaters in the country. The A.R.T. has a reputation of fostering work in a uniquely incubative environment allowing for truly unobstructed creativity. I was so excited about the prospect of making work here as opposed to the oft scrutinized and impeded commercial landscapes of NY or LA.

In terms of preparing for the role, what are you doing specifically to get ready to play Tom? Does it differ from how you prepare for movies and television?

A lot of reading. The text of the play of course. Biographies of Tennessee and his family. Journals of the playwright. Source material about The Depression and St. Louis, where the play takes place. And then rehearsal, rehearsal, rehearsal. That is the biggest  and most enjoyable difference between theater and film/TV—the time we spend diving into the material and the characters. It is through repetition and discipline that we are able to fully realize the character’s life and journey. In film an television it is often more through instinct (and a good editor).

What’s been your biggest challenge in balancing your film, television and theater career? How do you decide what projectS you’ll work on?

Making time for everything that I want to do can be tricky. But I have been very specific and articulate about my intention to do so, and I am surrounded by people who support that intention in all the necessary ways. I am so grateful for my business partners and advisors to help keep me moving forward with professional purpose and momentum. It frees me up to do the real work as I see it. The things on which I am meant to focus. 

After you wrap up the play, what’s next for you? What are you most excited about in 2013?

Immediately after I finish the play in Cambridge, I am gearing up to support the release of Star Trek Into Darkness which hits theaters on May 17th. From there I will be working on a couple of movies with my production company Before the Door Pictures and perhaps continuing to work on stage. This time maybe a little closer to Times Square…we’ll see. But a lot of exciting stuff on the horizon. I feel very fulfilled and grateful.

For more information on the The Glass Menagerie visit http://ppc.broadway.com/shows/the-glass-menagerie/  

(Source: snapm.ag)

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Q & A with Zachary Quinto


Q & A WITH ZACHARY QUINTO

Photography by Chiun-Kai Shih / Interview by Molli Sullivan

Most everyone knows you as a movie and television star, but you have a very accomplished theater career as well. Can you tell us a bit about why you love theater so much? 

The theater is where it all began for me. I have studied and performed on stage since I was 10 years old, and earned a BFA in acting from Carnegie Mellon School of Drama. My decision to move to LA after graduation was always intended as a means to an end. My goal was to build myself a film and television career that would allow me to diversify and focus on other aspects of storytelling also. Coming back to the theater is mostly about making good on a promise to myself. I’ve worked hard in Los Angeles to get myself to a point where I can leave and embrace other experiences. I finally feel that I am at that point, so I feel I must take the leap in continued pursuit of creative integrity and authenticity.

At this point in your career, you can be selective about the projects you work on. Why were you drawn to The Glass Menagerie?

There are so many factors that contributed to my decision. Firstly, the play and the playwright. To dive into this kind of classic American play is a true gift for any actor. To become deeply familiar with and connected to the language of such a master as Tennessee Williams is what drives me in my work. And then to play the most autobiographical character in his canon is the icing on the creative cake. Then there is the group of people assembling to bring this production to life. They are each truly remarkable and renowned. The opportunity to work with the likes of John Tiffany and Steven Hoggett and Bob Crowley and Cherry Jones was simply too much to pass up. And then the process. Being in Cambridge at one of the most respected regional theaters in the country. The A.R.T. has a reputation of fostering work in a uniquely incubative environment allowing for truly unobstructed creativity. I was so excited about the prospect of making work here as opposed to the oft scrutinized and impeded commercial landscapes of NY or LA.

In terms of preparing for the role, what are you doing specifically to get ready to play Tom? Does it differ from how you prepare for movies and television?

A lot of reading. The text of the play of course. Biographies of Tennessee and his family. Journals of the playwright. Source material about The Depression and St. Louis, where the play takes place. And then rehearsal, rehearsal, rehearsal. That is the biggest  and most enjoyable difference between theater and film/TV—the time we spend diving into the material and the characters. It is through repetition and discipline that we are able to fully realize the character’s life and journey. In film an television it is often more through instinct (and a good editor).

What’s been your biggest challenge in balancing your film, television and theater career? How do you decide what projectS you’ll work on?

Making time for everything that I want to do can be tricky. But I have been very specific and articulate about my intention to do so, and I am surrounded by people who support that intention in all the necessary ways. I am so grateful for my business partners and advisors to help keep me moving forward with professional purpose and momentum. It frees me up to do the real work as I see it. The things on which I am meant to focus. 

After you wrap up the play, what’s next for you? What are you most excited about in 2013?

Immediately after I finish the play in Cambridge, I am gearing up to support the release of Star Trek Into Darkness which hits theaters on May 17th. From there I will be working on a couple of movies with my production company Before the Door Pictures and perhaps continuing to work on stage. This time maybe a little closer to Times Square…we’ll see. But a lot of exciting stuff on the horizon. I feel very fulfilled and grateful.

For more information on the The Glass Menagerie visit http://ppc.broadway.com/shows/the-glass-menagerie/  

(Source: snapm.ag)

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Q & A with Zachary Quinto


Q & A WITH ZACHARY QUINTO

Photography by Chiun-Kai Shih / Interview by Molli Sullivan

Most everyone knows you as a movie and television star, but you have a very accomplished theater career as well. Can you tell us a bit about why you love theater so much? 

The theater is where it all began for me. I have studied and performed on stage since I was 10 years old, and earned a BFA in acting from Carnegie Mellon School of Drama. My decision to move to LA after graduation was always intended as a means to an end. My goal was to build myself a film and television career that would allow me to diversify and focus on other aspects of storytelling also. Coming back to the theater is mostly about making good on a promise to myself. I’ve worked hard in Los Angeles to get myself to a point where I can leave and embrace other experiences. I finally feel that I am at that point, so I feel I must take the leap in continued pursuit of creative integrity and authenticity.

At this point in your career, you can be selective about the projects you work on. Why were you drawn to The Glass Menagerie?

There are so many factors that contributed to my decision. Firstly, the play and the playwright. To dive into this kind of classic American play is a true gift for any actor. To become deeply familiar with and connected to the language of such a master as Tennessee Williams is what drives me in my work. And then to play the most autobiographical character in his canon is the icing on the creative cake. Then there is the group of people assembling to bring this production to life. They are each truly remarkable and renowned. The opportunity to work with the likes of John Tiffany and Steven Hoggett and Bob Crowley and Cherry Jones was simply too much to pass up. And then the process. Being in Cambridge at one of the most respected regional theaters in the country. The A.R.T. has a reputation of fostering work in a uniquely incubative environment allowing for truly unobstructed creativity. I was so excited about the prospect of making work here as opposed to the oft scrutinized and impeded commercial landscapes of NY or LA.

In terms of preparing for the role, what are you doing specifically to get ready to play Tom? Does it differ from how you prepare for movies and television?

A lot of reading. The text of the play of course. Biographies of Tennessee and his family. Journals of the playwright. Source material about The Depression and St. Louis, where the play takes place. And then rehearsal, rehearsal, rehearsal. That is the biggest  and most enjoyable difference between theater and film/TV—the time we spend diving into the material and the characters. It is through repetition and discipline that we are able to fully realize the character’s life and journey. In film an television it is often more through instinct (and a good editor).

What’s been your biggest challenge in balancing your film, television and theater career? How do you decide what projectS you’ll work on?

Making time for everything that I want to do can be tricky. But I have been very specific and articulate about my intention to do so, and I am surrounded by people who support that intention in all the necessary ways. I am so grateful for my business partners and advisors to help keep me moving forward with professional purpose and momentum. It frees me up to do the real work as I see it. The things on which I am meant to focus. 

After you wrap up the play, what’s next for you? What are you most excited about in 2013?

Immediately after I finish the play in Cambridge, I am gearing up to support the release of Star Trek Into Darkness which hits theaters on May 17th. From there I will be working on a couple of movies with my production company Before the Door Pictures and perhaps continuing to work on stage. This time maybe a little closer to Times Square…we’ll see. But a lot of exciting stuff on the horizon. I feel very fulfilled and grateful.

For more information on the The Glass Menagerie visit http://ppc.broadway.com/shows/the-glass-menagerie/  

(Source: snapm.ag)

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Q & A with Zachary Quinto


Q & A WITH ZACHARY QUINTO

Photography by Chiun-Kai Shih / Interview by Molli Sullivan

Most everyone knows you as a movie and television star, but you have a very accomplished theater career as well. Can you tell us a bit about why you love theater so much? 

The theater is where it all began for me. I have studied and performed on stage since I was 10 years old, and earned a BFA in acting from Carnegie Mellon School of Drama. My decision to move to LA after graduation was always intended as a means to an end. My goal was to build myself a film and television career that would allow me to diversify and focus on other aspects of storytelling also. Coming back to the theater is mostly about making good on a promise to myself. I’ve worked hard in Los Angeles to get myself to a point where I can leave and embrace other experiences. I finally feel that I am at that point, so I feel I must take the leap in continued pursuit of creative integrity and authenticity.

At this point in your career, you can be selective about the projects you work on. Why were you drawn to The Glass Menagerie?

There are so many factors that contributed to my decision. Firstly, the play and the playwright. To dive into this kind of classic American play is a true gift for any actor. To become deeply familiar with and connected to the language of such a master as Tennessee Williams is what drives me in my work. And then to play the most autobiographical character in his canon is the icing on the creative cake. Then there is the group of people assembling to bring this production to life. They are each truly remarkable and renowned. The opportunity to work with the likes of John Tiffany and Steven Hoggett and Bob Crowley and Cherry Jones was simply too much to pass up. And then the process. Being in Cambridge at one of the most respected regional theaters in the country. The A.R.T. has a reputation of fostering work in a uniquely incubative environment allowing for truly unobstructed creativity. I was so excited about the prospect of making work here as opposed to the oft scrutinized and impeded commercial landscapes of NY or LA.

In terms of preparing for the role, what are you doing specifically to get ready to play Tom? Does it differ from how you prepare for movies and television?

A lot of reading. The text of the play of course. Biographies of Tennessee and his family. Journals of the playwright. Source material about The Depression and St. Louis, where the play takes place. And then rehearsal, rehearsal, rehearsal. That is the biggest  and most enjoyable difference between theater and film/TV—the time we spend diving into the material and the characters. It is through repetition and discipline that we are able to fully realize the character’s life and journey. In film an television it is often more through instinct (and a good editor).

What’s been your biggest challenge in balancing your film, television and theater career? How do you decide what projectS you’ll work on?

Making time for everything that I want to do can be tricky. But I have been very specific and articulate about my intention to do so, and I am surrounded by people who support that intention in all the necessary ways. I am so grateful for my business partners and advisors to help keep me moving forward with professional purpose and momentum. It frees me up to do the real work as I see it. The things on which I am meant to focus. 

After you wrap up the play, what’s next for you? What are you most excited about in 2013?

Immediately after I finish the play in Cambridge, I am gearing up to support the release of Star Trek Into Darkness which hits theaters on May 17th. From there I will be working on a couple of movies with my production company Before the Door Pictures and perhaps continuing to work on stage. This time maybe a little closer to Times Square…we’ll see. But a lot of exciting stuff on the horizon. I feel very fulfilled and grateful.

For more information on the The Glass Menagerie visit http://ppc.broadway.com/shows/the-glass-menagerie/  

(Source: snapm.ag)

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